Tips for Improving Your Brick and Mortar Store Sales

Empty road with a sales text turning into arrow upward to the sky with bright sunlightPhysical stores, often called brick-and-mortar stores, are facing a conundrum these days. Many of them are still not riding the online bandwagon.

To be fair, not every online store is killing it, but those physical stores that have had the foresight to launch an online version — even those that have completely transferred their operations online — have a higher chance of success. It’s not too late for your physical store, even if these days the foot traffic is slower. Here are some suggestions that might help.

Have an Online Store

Of course, this is one of the better ways to make your operations more viable. More people these days go online to find what they need than visit a physical store outright. A website and social media presence can give you more opportunities to reach your target market.

Focus on Your Local Community

Regarding marketing a physical store, it is often the best idea to market to your local community. Your community was there for you when you were starting, and before online selling became more efficient. Don’t turn your back on your community now. More than ever, you need your community to help you out. Reach out to them with your marketing.

Offer Financing

If your products are pricey, such as high-end electronics or jewelry, and you aren’t offering financing already, you need to start considering it. You need the technology platform to offer in-store financing to enable more people to afford your products. Chances are, your competition is already doing it; many online stores have special offerings similar to it (credit card purchases are often like that). Your community may also appreciate that they can buy your goods on installment.

Tap Influencers

This is the new wave of marketing: asking or paying influencers to promote or use your products. These are the people you often find on blogs, YouTube channels, Instagram, and similar platforms. They aren’t necessarily celebrities (until they got famous online), but people who follow them number in the thousands or even millions, and these people are likely to believe them if they promote a particular product.

You don’t have an assurance that the influencer will like your product and say nice things about it unless you paid them (and not all of them accept payments because they want to maintain their independence). But if you have faith that your product is that good, and that people should buy it, an influencer might just change the game for your business.

It’s not easy keeping a brick-and-mortar store afloat. But if you follow the trends and do your best to catch up, you may not have to worry.

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