Get Them Hooked: 3 Hacks for A Livelier Classroom

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Happy kids in classKids of today have way more options than any other generation before had. At a swipe of their fingertips, they can access heaps of information or be entertained by widely available visual, auditory, or socially interactive media that relates to their interests. Considering how much technology has sped up the process of out-of-classroom learning, what can London’s education agency sector do to keep these kids firmly seated in their desks by bringing new media to the traditional classroom?

The secret? Keep them on their toes. Here ate 3 ways to do just that:

Start class every day with creative ice-breakers

While kids might initially shy away during the early days of adoption, daily ice-breakers allowing them to get to know their peers at a faster rate than if they were to just chant the polite “how are you?”. Ice breakers can take the form of short physical games or exercises, or mental riddles to stimulate their out-of-the-box thinking.

Get them in the mood for collaborative learning

Learning is a two-way street and it’s not limited to what knowledge the teacher can pass on to his or her students. Feedback from peers is equally valuable, as validating one another’s ideas fosters a spirit of supportiveness. Education agencies can take this a step further by facilitating classes in such a way that students will be comfortable to exercise critical thinking but in a constructive and emotionally intelligent manner.

Allot time for quick reflections

Written or spoken reflections help kids synthesize their learnings in the way they find to be most striking. By spending at least 10 minutes at the end of every class for this activity, students can look back on what they did right and what they could do better next time. Teachers must gauge the collective personality of the class.

While electronic screens dominate the way information is disseminated today, physical interaction is still king when it comes to pumping energy and stimulating young minds.

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